Getting a Healthcare Sales Job? “Sell” these Interview Skills

Are you looking for the opportunity to become a sales representative in a healthcare job? Much has been said about the need for well-developed personal selling skills, but it takes more than personal selling and a medical background to contribute as a major player in the challenges pharmaceutical companies face. A sales professional, no matter what his or her area of expertise, can find a place in pharmaceutical leadership based on many different sales and marketing skills.

If you are considering healthcare jobs, here are some areas where you can distinguish yourself as an effective sales representative:

Branding and Rebranding: It’s true that not every market allows for direct advertisement of medical products to potential consumer, but those that do play host to an increasingly contentious segment of sales, marketing, and advertising. Even if a team member is seen as a sales representative first and foremost, he or she should be able to pitch in with new ideas for outmaneuvering competitors and addressing public relations issues.

Social Media Marketing: Likewise, areas where direct advertising to consumers may be possible suffer from a serious problem — traditional sales and marketing channels are saturated with similar messages. Social media strategy is quickly becoming a way that pharmaceutical companies can cut through the clutter and motivate patients to work with their healthcare providers and physicians for a wider range of branded treatment options.

Provider Relationship Management: Those who are used to working directly with senior executives from major accounts are at an advantage when turning to healthcare jobs. Provider relationship management is key to maintaining a competitive foothold when regulatory or competitive changes force a sudden, medium-term shift in a firm’s priorities. This happens frequently when a formerly patented medicine becomes available for competitors to develop and re-define as generic at a lower price point.

Of course, it is also true that a background in the health sciences can be invaluable for a healthcare job sales representative. However, training in this area is rapidly becoming more modular and targeted — there are vast training resources available from reputable sources online that were inaccessible before. You have one other advantage: It can be much more difficult for someone with a strong healthcare background to become an effective sales representative than the converse. Strong selling requires direct experience, but that experience can come from a variety of contexts outside the bounds of the healthcare industry.