Interviewing for a Pharmaceutical Sales Job

Congratulations, you have landed that interview with one of the biggest pharmaceutical sales companies in the country, and all you have to do now is ace the interview. While this might seem like an impossibility, especially if you’re faced with some tough competition, there are ways that you can walk into your interview with confidence, even if you do feel nervous. In order to really impress your prospective employers, however, projecting confidence isn’t enough, especially if you’re interviewing for a major corporation who has to make absolutely sure that you will be right fit for their pharmaceutical sales team.

You have probably heard the expression about first impressions being important, and it could not be truer. Before you even speak, how you look will have a major impact on your interview, so it’s important that you know how to dress. Women should dress conservatively and avoid wearing jewelry that is chunky or makes noise (such as bangle bracelets). While a whiff of perfume is a nice touch, wearing too much will overshadow your skill and knowledge, especially if the person interviewing you has a sensitive nose. For men, a dark, well-pressed suit is a great way to show your would-be employer that you know how to dress in order to impress them and any clients that you would be meeting. Barring a tie-tack, a nice watch, or a wedding ring, men should avoid wearing jewelry completely. While that ear stud may not represent you as a person, it might make the wrong impression on a conservative employer.

Once you’ve dressed for success, the next step in acing that interview for your dream pharmaceutical sales job is to know as much as you can about the company before your interview. This isn’t to say that you should memorize their sales catalogue, but knowing what this major company sells, how they sell it, and the kind of clients they deal with can help you answer questions during the interview process. The more you know, the more interest you appear to have in the company, which tells the interview team that you’re eager to sell for them. In a way, you’re selling your skills as a salesman during this interview, and the best evidence of that skill will be the company’s desire to add you to their team. Interviewing for a major pharmaceutical sales company can be nerve wracking, but if you believe in yourself and your personal assets and skills, so will the people who are looking to hire you.